Eddie continues his donations even after death

St Oswald's supporter Eddie Frankland with a gardening award he received.

St Oswald's supporter Eddie Frankland with a gardening award he received.

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A dedicated charity supporter has ensured they still received help even after his death.

William Frankland, also known as Eddie, raised money for St Oswald’s Hospice throughout his life, either making cash donations or donating art material.

Everything Eddie has done for St Oswald’s is a brilliant testimony to his life.

Maureen Rumfitt

However, he died in February at the age of 68, still supporting the charity in his Will by leaving many personal possessions and household items, which will be resold through the hospice’s charity shops.

Eddie, from North Shields but who was living in Sacriston, was a dedicated gardener, but it was this hobby which resulted in an accident which injured his spine, forcing him to permanently require a wheelchair.

Eddie’s sister, Maureen Rumfitt said: “Everything Eddie has done for St Oswald’s is a brilliant testimony to his life.

“There was so much unhappiness in his childhood; it’s amazing what he has gone on to do, especially while suffering problems himself.”

“The House Clearance service was really good. We hope that they end up making a lot of money to go towards the Hospice.”

Eddie made numerous cash donations to the Hospice, totalling over £4,000, but his real passion was for St Oswald’s Craft Room,

He donated boxes of high quality materials, including; paint brushes, paper, acrylic paint, watercolour sets, books, pastels, clay, model kits and more, along with the odd bottle of sherry and pack of biscuits for patients to enjoy while they worked.

Fiona Clark, art and therapeutic facilitator, said: “We could never thank Eddie enough. He has made a phenomenal difference to the craft room.

“We would never have been able to do some of the things we can now do without his help.

“Eddie was always keen to hear what was going on and what patients liked to do. He told me that he realised through his disability what arts and crafts meant to him.

“That’s why he was so passionate about ensuring patients at the Hospice had the opportunity to take part in our craft room activities.

“I told him some patients enjoyed ‘painting by numbers’ and then just like that, cupboards worth of them were sent in; he was incredibly generous.

“We had always worried about materials in the past and were really restricted as to what we could afford to do. Eddie took that weight off our shoulders; his donations will keep us going for a very long time.”