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Anti-litter campaign ensures no foul-ups

Responsible dog ownership session at Rockcliffe First School, Whitley Bay, with pupils and Sgt Jason Leith (left) with dog Rosie and PC Steven Henry with dog Jackson.
REF 0204147660

Responsible dog ownership session at Rockcliffe First School, Whitley Bay, with pupils and Sgt Jason Leith (left) with dog Rosie and PC Steven Henry with dog Jackson. REF 0204147660

Special guests have been visiting schools to make sure there are no foul-ups when it comes to keeping the borough clean.

Theatrical performances from North Tyneside Council’s environmental mascot ‘Waldo the Wonderdog’ and arch enemy ‘Litter Bug’ have been taking place in school assemblies.

And due to a greater emphasis on responsible dog ownership and dog fouling as part of the Big Spring Clean campaign, two cocker spaniels – Rosie and Jackson – from Northumbria Police’s dog section have also been making an appearance.

Also helping spread the anti-litter message are students on the Prince’s Trust programme at TyneMet College.

Coun John Harrison, cabinet member for housing and the environment, said: “I would like to say a big thank you to the police, the students from TyneMet College and to the children from the schools.

“It’s a great way to include young people and to teach them from an early age about the importance of keeping the borough clean and tidy.”

Last Wednesday, 240 pupils at Rockcliffe First School, in Whitley Bay, were treated to a performance before taking part in a clean-up.

Chief Inspector George Maratty, from the police’s dog section, added: “It’s extremely important people from a young age know how to be a responsible dog owner.

“It’s hoped that if those we’ve spoken do decide to get a dog in the future, they will follow the advice we’ve given them which will ensure the area they live in is kept pleasant.

“We do listen to our residents’ concerns and working with our partners at North Tyneside Council through initiatives like this, we hope to address them and look for long term solutions.”

Kev Black, Prince’s Trust team leader at TyneMet College, said: “The students have worked extremely hard on this project and are very enthusiastic about spreading the anti-litter message.

“I hope that the school pupils enjoy the performance and that the play helps them to understand the effect littering has on their own environment.”

 

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