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Six get taste of life in the community

Back row (left to right) Sarah Wilson, Jack Knowles, Shazia Kanwal and Mihiran Wijayawardena. Front row (left to right) Asma Azzuz, Farhia Binte Mahmud, Kelly Wood and Lemeya Chaudhury.

Back row (left to right) Sarah Wilson, Jack Knowles, Shazia Kanwal and Mihiran Wijayawardena. Front row (left to right) Asma Azzuz, Farhia Binte Mahmud, Kelly Wood and Lemeya Chaudhury.

A GROUP of young people from around the world visited North Tyneside to see how the borough supports its communities.

The six ‘Active Citizens’ travelled from Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and other parts of the UK to spend three days in the borough finding out how people have created projects to improve lives.

Officials are also hoping the visit – part of the British Council’s Active Citizens programme and hosted by North Tyneside Council’s participation and engagement team – will lead to long-term global connections and knowledge-sharing.

Among the people the group met were Mayor Linda Arkley and Young Mayor Isaac Sidney.

They also met young people and leaders at a variety of community projects including Phoenix Detached Youth Project in Wallsend, and the Tim Lamb Centre at the Rising Sun Country Park run by Pathways4All.

Mrs Arkley said: “This is a fantastic opportunity for us to showcase what North Tyneside has to offer and the work we do to support our children and young people.

“We have some exceptional community and voluntary groups that are really changing people’s lives, and we are very proud of the valuable work they do.

“We look forward to learning from our visitors’ feedback on what we are doing, and we hope that what they learn here will have an impact on their own community work back home.”

Monomita Nag-Chowdhury, active citizens manager at the British Council, said: “International study visits are about giving people that are working hard to make life better in their neighbourhoods the chance to learn from the experience of other parts of the world and to develop ideas, gather inspiration and get advice from the UK on how they can run projects that will really make a difference to their communities.

“The knowledge and skills they acquire over two days in North Tyneside will have a lasting impact on communities in Bangladesh, Pakistan, Sri Lanka and parts of the UK as the participants return home and begin tackling social issues.”

 

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