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Theatrical lessons in helping environment

Young people from TyneMet College with members of the council, including chief executive Patrick Melia and Mayor Norma Redfearn.

Young people from TyneMet College with members of the council, including chief executive Patrick Melia and Mayor Norma Redfearn.

A theatrical performance helped college students deliver an energy efficient message to children.

A total of 20 young people studying on the Prince Trust’s programme at TyneMet College visited primary schools in North Tyneside in the run up to Christmas.

The 16 to 24-year-old’s created a performance for nearly 2,000 children as part of North Tyneside Council’s energy efficiency message.

The play, which focused on efficiency and climate change, starred the council’s environmental mascot ‘Waldo the Wonderdog’ and his arch enemy ‘Litter Bug’.

Coun John Stirling, cabinet member for sustainable development, said: “The council has set itself an ambitious target of reducing the borough’s emissions by 20 per cent within seven years, and although we’re committed to doing so, we cannot do it alone.

“It’s fantastic the TyneMet students are willing to give up their time to help us to communicate these important messages in such a fun and interactive way to their younger peers.

“If we’re going to achieve a more sustainable borough, it’s essential our future generations are aware of the energy efficiency measures they can take.”

Focusing on saving energy in homes and schools, the show told the tale of Litter Bug draining all of Waldo’s energy and how he can get it back by switching off lights and appliances when not in use, and other steps he needed to take to conserve energy.

Kev Black, Prince’s Trust course leader at the college, said: “The students worked extremely hard on this project, they have used and developed creative skills that they didn’t realise they had.”

 

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