Looking back...at power station strike

Carville Power Station was put into commercial operation in June 1904. At the time of its opening it was equipped with two 3000 horse-power and two 7000 horse-power turbo-alternators and was the largest generating station in Great Britain.

Carville Power Station was put into commercial operation in June 1904. At the time of its opening it was equipped with two 3000 horse-power and two 7000 horse-power turbo-alternators and was the largest generating station in Great Britain.

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Carville Power Station was put into commercial operation in June 1904 and was the largest generating station in Great Britain. An adjoining second station was built in 1916.

In support of mineworkers, the Trade Unions Congress called for a General Strike on May 1, 1926. This came into effect at midnight on May 4.

On May 6 the District Joint Industrial Council decided to withdraw its workers from electric power stations and to withhold all electrical supply, with the exception of domestic use, hospitals, infirmaries and public institutions. This applied to manual workers only and technical staff would continue with voluntary labour to maintain essential supplies.

The image suggests that emergency relief for Carville Power Station was covered by Detachment F Company, Training Battalion, Royal Signals.

The General strike lasted nine days.

The Shields Daily News reported on May 8 that such withdrawal of labour had had little effect on Newcastle and district, and Mr RP Sloan, managing director of the Newcastle Electric Supply Company, stated: “The men came out at 10pm on Thursday night, and the emergency staff went in. We have maintained our usual supply and everything is normal.”

If anyone has further information please ask for Discover at North Shields Customer First Centre on 0191 643 5270 or email discover@northtyneside.gov.uk