Perverted parking in our streets is inconsiderate and inappropiate

I HAVE been meaning to endorse the views of K Armstrong in the letter to the News Guardian, May 31, concerning what I regard, as do others, the totally unacceptable habits of a large number of car drivers, and perhaps the majority of commercial vehicle drivers, when parking.

Various sorts of such parking, on grass verges and pavements take place all over, as noted by various councillors of all parties. The degree to which infringements are an offence or an obstruction are in the eyes of the police (and council officers) which see such, but as said in May 31 letter, the amount of damage caused is very significant (and continues).

Though the police advise people that obviously the safest place for a car at night is in your garage, or at least on/at your property, behind gates if you have them, this is not pursued much.

In the immediate area where I live, there are some well known households where parking on pavements, preferably on a telephone or TV box cover, is a tradition of some years. This may not be even in their own street, or where an owner has at least a sight of their vehicle for security reasons.

This takes place for days on end, in the dark, in all weathers, at blind corners or similar.

The fact this continues can only mean the authorities do not act to get vehicles off highways when it is obvious it would only take a minute to do so. There is in circulation a police photo where an officer says something like, inconsiderate/inappropriate parking should not take place. They could well describe what we see locally, as perverted parking

In response to requests by the council, particularly the elected mayor, these issues have been referred to in respect of broken flag type pavements, damaged grassed areas, broken street furniture (such as bollards), all of some danger to pedestrians, and if repairs do actually take place, a continuous drain of council funds.

I heard a police inspector last week tell a questioner at a local meeting that pavement parking and all that entails for invalid carriages, prams, and even the public generally, was an offence on which, if known, they would take action.

People fall due to bad pavements.

MR A M JOHNSON

Cullercoats