Plans for 14 new houses approved despite concerns over the design

An artist's impression of the new houses approved on the site of the former High Point Hotel in Whitley Bay.
An artist's impression of the new houses approved on the site of the former High Point Hotel in Whitley Bay.

A key part of Whitley Bay’s seafront is to be redeveloped.

Plans have been approved to build 14 houses on the site of the former High Point hotel on the Promenade.

The proposal represents redevelopment and reinvigoration of Whitley Bay seafront

Stephen Miller, of Miller Partnership Architects

Members of North Tyneside Council’s planning committee approved the application by High Point View Ltd despite concerns it was an overdevelopment of the site, would impact nearby houses and had insufficient parking.

The plans will see 11 three-bedroom, two four-bedroom and one five-bedroom house built on two sides, with car parking – featuring two spaces per house – behind the development.

But residents in Gordon Terrace said the three-and-a-half storey development would block out the light and leave them looking out onto a brick wall.

Stephen McQuaid told the committee: “I’m not against residential development on this site, most residents will be over the moon to see this site made into a residential development but there hasn’t been proper consideration of residents in Gordon Terrace and the impact this will have.

“If I was to stand ten feet into my living room, all I will see will be a brick wall. I will lose most of the sunlight. I think it’s an overdevelopment of the site.”

Stephen Miller, of architects Miller Partnership Architects, said: “We want to positively enhance the neighbourhood. This is a very simple, traditional piece.

“The proposal represents redevelopment and reinvigoration of Whitley Bay seafront.”

Concerns were raised by committee members of the insufficient number of car parking spaces, particularly for the four and five-bedroom homes.

Ward councillor Sandra Graham said: “We do have significant pressures in the area on those streets which do not have any car parking. There is also an overdevelopment of the site. I also have issues with the contemporary design.”

Members voted ten to one in favour of the application.

Coun David Lilly said: “I commend the council for demolishing the site.

“This proposal is too contemporary in it’s design and will stick out like a sore thumb.

“It will impact on the existing residents ability to park in nearby streets.

“But an existing scheme (for 34 flats) was much more predominant, refused but accepted on appeal.

“It looks like we have little option but to accept this application as we could go down the same route with the same result.”