Restoration of station is still on track

Morris Muter, of Station Developments Ltd, and Mike Steele, of Mansell Construction Services, examine the newly returned metalwork as it is returned to its original location at Tynemouth Station.
Morris Muter, of Station Developments Ltd, and Mike Steele, of Mansell Construction Services, examine the newly returned metalwork as it is returned to its original location at Tynemouth Station.

HISTORIC iron canopies have been reinstalled at Tynemouth Metro station as refurbishment work continues.

Part of the cast iron canopy at the grade II-listed station have been put back in place.

Work on the Victorian station began in March and has seen several sections of the dilapidated canopies on the east platforms being removed for specialist repairs off site, but they have now been put back.

Mansell Construction Services is continuing with preservation work on the canopies that did not need to be removed, as well as repairs to stonework, leading, roofing and gutters.

Staff from the firm have also painted the west platform and are currently painting the main concourse on the east platform.

Once all the restored canopies are in place, individually measured glass panels will be inserted.

A performance area on the platform will also be created.

Much of the restoration work is taking place at night to avoid disruption to Metro services.

The rescue package was co-ordinated by North Tyneside Council, English Heritage, Nexus and the site’s owner, Station Development.

The bill for the work is £3.68m, £1.9m of which has been put up by the government.

Morris Muter, managing director of Station Developments, said: “We are delighted that the canopy restoration work has gone to plan, and the return of the worst-condition canopies, now restored, is a great achievement.

“The station is starting to take shape into what will soon become one of the finest examples of a Victorian railway station in Britain.

“We look forward to working with our partners over the next year to develop the plans further.”

Carol Pyrah, planning director for English Heritage in the north east, said: “Tynemouth Station is one of the most important examples of Victorian railway architecture in England.

“After many years of uncertainty, it’s wonderful to see such good progress being made in repairing this distinctive and much-loved site.

“The work starting to emerge from behind the hoardings is testament to the specialist skills of all those involved and provides an exciting glimpse of how the building will soon be central to the Tynemouth community once more.”