Schools delight at A-level results in North Tyneside – Video

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STUDENTS are celebrating another great set of A-level results and preparing for a future in employment or at university.

Schools across the borough achieved an overall pass rate of 99.6 per cent of pupils achieving A* to E grades, with some schools managing their best ever results.

Successful A Level students (l-r) Matthew Berry, Rebecca Simpson and Sam Volpe from Whitley Bay High School.

Successful A Level students (l-r) Matthew Berry, Rebecca Simpson and Sam Volpe from Whitley Bay High School.

The average point score per student is also the highest North Tyneside has ever seen, with almost ten per cent of pupils achieving three or more A* or A grades at A-level.

Students were in early at Whitley Bay High School to get their results, with many left speechless at the high results.

The school – which has the largest sixth form in the borough with 264 pupils – achieved an overall pass rate of 99.1 per cent, with 49 per cent of pupils achieving A*, A or B grades.

Steve Wilson, executive head of sixth form, said: “We are absolutely delighted for the 28 students who achieved three or more As and A* grades.

“We are also very impressed with the graft ad determination of many students who achieved better than their target grades, in a fiercely competitive situation.”

Five students are planning to study medicine at university with three securing places at Oxbridge.

Rebecca Simpson is planning on studying English at Lady Margaret Hall at Oxford University after receiving two A*s and three As in English Literature, French, biology and general studies.

The 18-year-old, who is also a keen athlete, said: “I’m still in shock, I didn’t think it was mathematically possible for me to get the grades, but I did work really hard.”

Sam Volpe, who will be studying English at Exeter College at Oxford University, said: “I was largely relieved at the results.

“I’m relieved it is all over, it was such an ordeal to get the offer, after that it’s the hard work and it now means I know what I’m doing next year.”

Matthew Berry will be studying medicine at Christ College at Cambridge University after getting two A*s and three As.

He said: “I’m over the moon. I’ve heard from friends how they had done and I was thinking I couldn’t have done as well as them but it’s fantastic.

“I want to become a doctor, I’m just deciding whether it’s a surgeon or a GP.”

Staff and students at Wallsend’s Churchill Community College were celebrating their best ever results, with all 51 Year 13 pupils passing their A-levels, and more than 50 per cent of those getting A*s or A grades.

Headteacher David Baldwin said: “The results for our Year 13 are by far and away the best results we have ever achieved here.

“This year over half of our A-level grades were A* or A. We’re so proud of our students this year and what they’ve achieved.”

Natacha Ndamukunda, 18, has secured a place on the competitive Applied Psychology degree at Durham University after getting two A*, B and C.

She said: “I was relieved, all the stress came out. I knew it was over so I could just stay calm.”

Her older brother Jonas Hirondelle, who re-sat a year, will be studying Human Nutrition at Manchester Metropolitan after achieving and A and two Cs.

The keen rugby league player said: “We were both nervous for each other.

“I want to be a dietician, whether with a professional sports club or at a hospital, and this course is good for that.

“I’ll also be training with the reserves at Oldham Rugby League Club while I’m down there.”

Carl Plane, 19, will be studying history at Cambridge University after getting A*, A and B grades.

“It was a relief more than anything when I got the results,” he said. “I was hopeful of getting these results.

“I’ve done some teaching at the school, helping some of the history GCSE students, and I’d like to become a teacher.”

Adrian Cheng, who is hoping to be an accountant, will be studying a degree in accountancy and finance at Durham University after getting A*, A, A, B.

“I couldn’t believe it,” he said. “I felt pretty nervous but I thought I’d done everything I could do.

“I was here at 9am when the school opened to get my result.”