Students learn that child’s play can be a risky business

Apprentices studying the Playwork Apprenticeship programme at Tyne Met College working with students studying Early Years courses at 'risky play sessions'. Apprentice Shaunna Tweddle (right) watching one of the students on the 'bikes with no brakes' element.
Apprentices studying the Playwork Apprenticeship programme at Tyne Met College working with students studying Early Years courses at 'risky play sessions'. Apprentice Shaunna Tweddle (right) watching one of the students on the 'bikes with no brakes' element.
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YOUNG apprentices have been teaching students about the risks involved in child’s play.

Play-work apprentices and early-years students at Wallsend’s Tyne Metropolitan College spent a morning at Shiremoor’s adventure playground taking part in practice risk assessments.

The students also had to make their way round the playground while blindfolded and ride bikes with no brakes to get a better understanding of the dangers children face while playing.

Pat Blyth, business development consultant at the college, said: “Even though this was a teaching and learning session, all participants enjoyed themselves, trying out the resources and learning how to implement them.”

Four play-work apprenticeships have been created as a joint venture by Constructing Communities, North Tyneside Council and the college.

Mayor Linda Arkley said: “Apprenticeships are a vital way of providing job opportunities for young people, enabling them to develop specific skills and gain experience and qualifications.

“North Tyneside Council has made a commitment to supporting apprentices and work-based learning opportunities in a wide range of areas.”