DEFENCES: Works must be robust

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I have submitted letters related to the climate change issue and our continuing use of carbon-based fuels.

My previous contributions on the sea line marine engineering works have tried to offer some support to the council’s officers and their associates in their efforts to provide public areas in Whitley Bay, but more significantly the necessity to provide robust sea defences where weak points are identified.

I observed that however someone else constructs similar work at Elsewhere on Sea, the council’s engineers are well qualified to deal with sea defences they are responsible for, and they have to eventually choose only one way of doing a project out of the many forms possible.

I dare say the controversial length of the Central Promenade could be done with a grass-surfaced, armoured, sloping construction, but another civil engineer would come up with another solution equally as sound.

If the New Beginnings group’s well-qualified experts have reported that no rebuilding of the main sea defences is required, I assume that a suitable inspection and testing procedure has been carried out, all at a cost.

However much money-saving has been revealed on auditing designs, I trust that the eventual works will have taken into account the climate change prediction of higher sea levels and more severe weather.

Even the vertical wall under the debatable balustrades and the associated flat public terraced area have to be robust enough for occasional wave impact and inundation when spring tides and surges occur.

After many years of working with civil engineers, and my acquaintance with councillors and council officers, I believe I am moderately well informed.

Acquaintances also tell me they believe the critics of their efforts are a vocal minority.

AM Johnson

Cullercoats