POLICE: No shortage of chiefs

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Rising rates of crime, particularly knife crime, prompted our MP Sir Alan Campbell to declare that ‘The Thin Blue Line is getting thinner’.

The Thick Blue Line, though, remains untouched, and was even enhanced by an unnecessary legion of Police and Crime Commissioners.

In 2013 eight regional police forces in Scotland were amalgamated into one national force, headed by one Chief Constable. Some time ago, Regional Crime Squads in England were merged into one National Crime Agency.

Among reasons for these changes were reduction in costs and better use of resources.

Northumbria Police reduced its organisation from 14 Base Command Units into five Area Commands.

But police in England persist in maintaining 43 administrations, each with their own headquarters and methods of storing data.

Home Secretary Sajid Javid is on record calling for greater cooperation between forces. With the sensible joining together of forces this collaboration would already be in place.

Sir Alan is of the opinion that the thinning of the blue line is merely due to insufficient government funding.

It would be helpful if an experienced ex Home Office minister would propose the complete restructuring of police forces.

It is with alarm that we view the diminishing numbers of PCs available to patrol our streets. There is, however, no apparent shortage of Chief Constables and other senior administrators.

Frank Clayforth

North Shields